Browsing All posts tagged under »teaching«

Consider buying a book– new, and now

March 22, 2012

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The Society for American Archaeology annual meeting is coming next month. Like thousands of others, I will make the pilgrimage (to Memphis this year) and present a paper (in a session on history of collecting) and discuss a session (on household archaeology, one where Liz Brumfiel was supposed to be the other discussant). I will […]

Honoring Janus, looking backward and forward

January 2, 2012

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Happy New Year! Ever wonder why January 1 is observed as New Year’s Day in the Gregorian calendar? I went on a journey to find a rationale for this unusual choice; biased by years of studying ancient Mesoamerica, I found it odd that with the winter solstice so close, the year began at an apparently […]

Burying the dead (at Tlatilco and elsewhere)

March 19, 2011

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I read a wide swath of archaeological news every day, and this past week the news I am reading has been resonating– or really, has presented a counterpoint to– the writing I have been doing myself. Because, as is typical, many of the news stories I am reading are about finds of human remains, which […]

Roman Sex, Online and Broadcast

January 18, 2011

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“We end with pepper, and we’re going to begin with porn.” Now, that’s an eye-catching sentence. Or really, since this is a broadcast made available by BBC Radio, an ear-catching sentence. In 2010, the BBC collaborated with the British Museum to produce a history of humanity– through descriptions of 100 objects. The series is fabulous […]

Archaeology of masculinity

September 22, 2010

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When I began teaching archaeology of sex and gender as an interdisciplinary course, I had two expectations about who would take the course that simply have not held up over time. The first was that I expected to see a lot of women’s and gender studies students take the course. In fact, students from these […]

Back to school: Teaching archaeology of sex and gender

September 21, 2010

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I started this blog for one reason: to create a space in support of people like me who have been teaching the archaeology of sex and gender. My book, Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives, was written as a tangible product of the rewarding experience of teaching the course I developed at Berkeley, Letters & Sciences 180A: […]

Older women, older men

August 25, 2010

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The article on naturenews online is headlined ‘Grandmother Hypothesis’ Takes a Hit. The punchline? researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology constructed computer simulations intended to test University of Utah anthropologist Kristen Hawkes’ decades-old proposal that human longevity is an evolutionary consequence of the adaptive advantage conferred by having older women– “grandmothers”– available […]

Transforming archaeology through learning about sex and gender: final reflection papers

May 18, 2010

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The final reflection paper, unlike a research paper or project, asked students to integrate what they saw as key themes of the course, relating them to a book they had read independently. While these papers are too long to post in their entirety, it may be helpful to consider what made for an excellent final […]

Sex Work on the Barbary Coast: Anatomy of a Final Group Project

May 17, 2010

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How do students develop an outstanding final group project? My example here is from spring 2008, research culminating in a video made by the students in the section as they walked through San Francisco’s Barbary Coast, locating buildings that served as brothels and streets that were once centers of sex work. San Francisco’s Historical Society […]

Final reflection paper

May 16, 2010

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The assignments in “Archaeology of sex and gender” build gradually to give students experience in reviewing the scholarly literature already selected for the course; finding new scholarly literature on a topic of interest to them; working with others to develop and present additional course content; and finally, in what I call a reflection paper, synthesize […]