Browsing All posts tagged under »gender«

“Gay Caveman”: Wrecking a perfectly good story

April 7, 2011

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So, I get up this morning in Paris and do my news search, and immediately I see articles all over the world headlined “Gay Caveman”. As I write, the most recent being served up is from The West Australian. Not sure but I suspect that is the Austalian equivalent of a really small town newspaper, […]

“Exploring Sex and Gender in Bioarchaeology”: Some comments

April 2, 2011

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Just back from the annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, where I had the pleasure of being a discussant on a session organized by Sabrina Agarwal and Julie Wesp. Since my comments run to 2200 words, no way to post them and no point either– who would read them? But here are some […]

Burying the dead (at Tlatilco and elsewhere)

March 19, 2011

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I read a wide swath of archaeological news every day, and this past week the news I am reading has been resonating– or really, has presented a counterpoint to– the writing I have been doing myself. Because, as is typical, many of the news stories I am reading are about finds of human remains, which […]

Sex work and archaeology

March 5, 2011

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Why are brothels such a common focus of archaeologies of gender? This question was spurred by reading the most recent news coverage about research directed by Mary Beaudry of Boston University on artifacts recovered at the Mill Pond site during the “Big Dig”, massive excavations that were required to place freeways underground. Back in October […]

Collateral damage: Egyptian archaeology

February 5, 2011

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What are we to make of reports that “one of the few ancient Egyptian tombs devoted solely to a woman”, the tomb of Maia, wet nurse to Tutankhamun, was “completely destroyed”? First, I would not want to over-react, or be drawn into what is essentially a reactionary script that elevates the importance of things over […]

Anthropology is a science…and more

December 30, 2010

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A little off-topic but in my view worth reposting here from the original location. Notice that if Nicholas Wade’s view of anthropology were valid, this blog could not exist: science and research on sex and gender seem to be incompatible to him. “The purposes of the Association shall be to advance anthropology as the science […]

The aggressive bully or the charming Statesman?

December 15, 2010

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“Who has higher fertility and more surviving offspring – the aggressive bully or the charming Statesman?” So Christopher von Rueden, described as a doctoral student in anthropology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, summarized the point of his research, publicized by UCSB, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Von Rueden admits […]

Loose women of the Amazon

November 14, 2010

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You really have to watch those metaphors: “Johnny has two daddies” may have been common in Amazonian cultures blares World Science, inadvertently implying that researchers are suggesting traditional Amazonian society was unusually gay-friendly. Sify News manages at least to keep the story heterosexual: Extramarital sexual affairs were common in Amazonian cultures is its take. Still, […]

Women warriors and terracotta armies

October 24, 2010

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A recent visit to the Royal Ontario Museum’s exhibition “The Warrior Emperor and China’s Terracotta Army” got me thinking again about the topic of women warriors. The famous Qin dynasty (221 BC- 206 BC) terra cotta statues dominated the first galleries. But then there was another room with smaller Han dynasty (206 BC-220 AD) terra […]

Archaeology of masculinity

September 22, 2010

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When I began teaching archaeology of sex and gender as an interdisciplinary course, I had two expectations about who would take the course that simply have not held up over time. The first was that I expected to see a lot of women’s and gender studies students take the course. In fact, students from these […]