Browsing All posts tagged under »embodiment«

Approaching sex through archaeology: becoming male and female

May 6, 2010

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When you move away from the idea that sex/gender is an inherent essence, something predefined at (or even before) birth, towards a performative, iterative, idea of sex/gender as something that you do, an ongoing process of acting in a particular way, the conversation shifts from “being” to “becoming”. Because the act of becoming, performing, enacting, […]

Approaching sex through archaeology: third genders and beyond

May 5, 2010

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Returning to a theme from the previous week, third genders, I begin my discussion of method and theory and how they change what archaeologists think we can do with a reconsideration rooted in Sandra Hollimon’s work on Chumash society of California. In Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives, I describe what Hollimon sketches out in a series […]

European bodies

April 28, 2010

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I use Thomas Laqueuer’s Making Sex to frame my discussion of the European tradition of thinking about sex. While I only require two chapters, I make reference to others in my own lectures. By asking students to consider how external genitalia could be understand as evidence for one sex at one point in history, and […]

But isn’t biology normally dual?

April 25, 2010

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One of the questions students raise at the beginning of this course, confronted with the work of Anne Fausto Sterling and Thomas Laqueur, is about biological sex: yes, they can see that things like musculature, hair length, even height don’t fall neatly into two groups; but isn’t it true that normal sexual biology consists of […]

So what does Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives do?

April 22, 2010

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Karina Croucher provides a better overview of the book than I ever have, in her April 2010 review in the American Journal of Archaeology Online: The book is structured into an introduction and five chapters that cover various thematic areas. The author challenges constructions of sex and gender categories, addresses aspects of power and hierarchy, […]

Feminist Review: You will never look at sex and gender identity in absolute terms again

April 21, 2010

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I have been delighted by the number of reviewers and people using Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives in teaching who have gotten the central point of the book: sex and gender identity have to be understood as complex, dynamic, relational, material, but above all, historical. That said, what did the Feminist Review mean in this comment? […]