Browsing All Posts filed under »teaching«

Reflections on Young People and Gender Categories

July 18, 2013

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Note: I posted this on What Makes Us Human; reposting it here because I would be interested in dialogue with readers who might have had related experiences– please comment, but know all comments are moderated and there may be a delay before I get to them. The story from NPR is headlined Young People Push […]

“So I could be easeful”: Celebrate and Support New Scholars

May 4, 2012

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The Chronicle of Higher Education is a tabloid that few outside the academy will have heard of, and fewer insider the academy actually read than might be indicated by its ubiquity in campus administrative offices. It becomes relevant to many new or nearing completion PhDs because it contains employment ads. While the image conjured up […]

Consider buying a book– new, and now

March 22, 2012

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The Society for American Archaeology annual meeting is coming next month. Like thousands of others, I will make the pilgrimage (to Memphis this year) and present a paper (in a session on history of collecting) and discuss a session (on household archaeology, one where Liz Brumfiel was supposed to be the other discussant). I will […]

Nuns and Princesses (Middle Saxon Edition)

March 18, 2012

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Catching up with reading recent archaeology news, I am coming late to the Cambridge Archaeological Unit’s report that they titled Mystery of Anglo-Saxon teen buried in bed with gold cross. Great website from Cambridge University, lots of good long contextual quotes, and a sympathetic subject: a teenage girl buried with a piece of craftwork comparable […]

Honoring Janus, looking backward and forward

January 2, 2012

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Happy New Year! Ever wonder why January 1 is observed as New Year’s Day in the Gregorian calendar? I went on a journey to find a rationale for this unusual choice; biased by years of studying ancient Mesoamerica, I found it odd that with the winter solstice so close, the year began at an apparently […]

Burying the dead (at Tlatilco and elsewhere)

March 19, 2011

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I read a wide swath of archaeological news every day, and this past week the news I am reading has been resonating– or really, has presented a counterpoint to– the writing I have been doing myself. Because, as is typical, many of the news stories I am reading are about finds of human remains, which […]

Roman Sex, Online and Broadcast

January 18, 2011

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“We end with pepper, and we’re going to begin with porn.” Now, that’s an eye-catching sentence. Or really, since this is a broadcast made available by BBC Radio, an ear-catching sentence. In 2010, the BBC collaborated with the British Museum to produce a history of humanity– through descriptions of 100 objects. The series is fabulous […]

Archaeology of masculinity

September 22, 2010

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When I began teaching archaeology of sex and gender as an interdisciplinary course, I had two expectations about who would take the course that simply have not held up over time. The first was that I expected to see a lot of women’s and gender studies students take the course. In fact, students from these […]

Back to school: Teaching archaeology of sex and gender

September 21, 2010

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I started this blog for one reason: to create a space in support of people like me who have been teaching the archaeology of sex and gender. My book, Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives, was written as a tangible product of the rewarding experience of teaching the course I developed at Berkeley, Letters & Sciences 180A: […]

Older women, older men

August 25, 2010

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The article on naturenews online is headlined ‘Grandmother Hypothesis’ Takes a Hit. The punchline? researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology constructed computer simulations intended to test University of Utah anthropologist Kristen Hawkes’ decades-old proposal that human longevity is an evolutionary consequence of the adaptive advantage conferred by having older women– “grandmothers”– available […]

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