Browsing All Posts filed under »embodiment«

Classical junk

November 20, 2010

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(with apologies to the popular revolt against the TSA…) 348 articles, and counting. And that’s just the English language press… Google News reports at least 74 articles in Italian and another 50 in French. That’s how much news coverage Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi has received for his decision to have a statue of Mars […]

Ötzi and his kin

August 28, 2010

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Science News and Discovery both have publicized a new theory about Ötzi, the famous “iceman” found in the Alps, published in Antiquity. Instead of dying alone after fleeing the person who shot an arrow in his shoulder, researchers now suggest that the body was found downhill from its original burial site, on a formal stone […]

Steroid-fueled Neanderthals?

July 7, 2010

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Prehistoric man apparently boasted a rock-hard body, including an overdeveloped right arm that would make Popeye jealous. Olive Oyl,your hero is waiting… The best line in this New York Daily News story is this: Simply put, the Neanderthal body was brimming with natural steroids. Really? add a gratuitous reference to “girlie-men”, and the story itself […]

Written in the bones: woman gladiator or upwardly mobile peasant?

July 4, 2010

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Or maybe not. The BBC headline blares Female ‘gladiator’ remains found in Herefordshire and the alarm in my head goes off. Are there weapons, are there any of the things specific to gladiators? well, no. So what’s the real story here? The lead: the archaeologists “have found the grave of a massive, muscular woman”. And […]

Egypt’s chief archaeologist: Tutankhamun “was actually well-developed”

July 1, 2010

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You have to think that Zahi Hawass will not want to be remembered for this quote, out of everything he has to say about Egyptian antiquities. But when the intersection between archaeology and sex becomes literally the intersection of archaeology and… sex, I am willing to bet that this is one thing Hawass says that […]

“Lady Di of the 10th century?”: Poor Eadgyth!

June 17, 2010

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“She was a beautiful English princess who married one of Europe’s most powerful monarchs and dazzled subjects with her charity and charm.” Thus did AP reporter Raphael G. Satter start a widely-reproduced story in January that the LA Daily News headline writer reduced to “Lady Di of the 10th Century“.  (The Huffington Post more soberly […]

Gladiators, sex, and gender

June 8, 2010

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Every so often, an archaeological find helps clarify why it is critical that we ask questions about the differences among people of the same biological sex, and reminds us that an archaeology of sex and gender has to be as much concerned about men as women. The spectacular cemetery in York, England, that has been […]

Transforming archaeology through learning about sex and gender: final reflection papers

May 18, 2010

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The final reflection paper, unlike a research paper or project, asked students to integrate what they saw as key themes of the course, relating them to a book they had read independently. While these papers are too long to post in their entirety, it may be helpful to consider what made for an excellent final […]

Approaching sex through archaeology: becoming male and female

May 6, 2010

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When you move away from the idea that sex/gender is an inherent essence, something predefined at (or even before) birth, towards a performative, iterative, idea of sex/gender as something that you do, an ongoing process of acting in a particular way, the conversation shifts from “being” to “becoming”. Because the act of becoming, performing, enacting, […]

Approaching sex through archaeology: third genders and beyond

May 5, 2010

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Returning to a theme from the previous week, third genders, I begin my discussion of method and theory and how they change what archaeologists think we can do with a reconsideration rooted in Sandra Hollimon’s work on Chumash society of California. In Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives, I describe what Hollimon sketches out in a series […]