Browsing All posts tagged under »art history«

Bonampak Sex Change: From Heir to Heiress

October 28, 2013

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An article in the Mexican newspaper La Cronica de Hoy reported last Thursday on a new book being presented in Mexico this week, The Spectacle of the Late Maya Court: Reflections on the Murals of Bonampak. Written by art historians Mary Ellen Miller and Claudia Brittenham, the book builds on a long-term project by Miller […]

(Warrior) Queen for a Day

October 5, 2012

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Tomb of Maya Queen Found– “Lady Snake Lord” Ruled Centipede Kingdom says the headline from National Geographic. And not just any kind of queen– the story opens The suspected tomb and remains of a great Maya warrior queen have been discovered in Guatemala. [emphasis added] I am trying to be excited. I am trying not […]

Honoring Janus, looking backward and forward

January 2, 2012

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Happy New Year! Ever wonder why January 1 is observed as New Year’s Day in the Gregorian calendar? I went on a journey to find a rationale for this unusual choice; biased by years of studying ancient Mesoamerica, I found it odd that with the winter solstice so close, the year began at an apparently […]

Separated at Birth

October 19, 2011

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The story in ArtDaily caught my eye for a couple of reasons. First, there was the headline: Researchers at SMU-led Etruscan dig in Italy discover ancient depiction of childbirth – first of its kind ever found. Yet another  “first of its kind ever found”, I thought, sighing about the media (again). But then I took […]

Roman Sex, Online and Broadcast

January 18, 2011

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“We end with pepper, and we’re going to begin with porn.” Now, that’s an eye-catching sentence. Or really, since this is a broadcast made available by BBC Radio, an ear-catching sentence. In 2010, the BBC collaborated with the British Museum to produce a history of humanity– through descriptions of 100 objects. The series is fabulous […]

Classical junk

November 20, 2010

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(with apologies to the popular revolt against the TSA…) 348 articles, and counting. And that’s just the English language press… Google News reports at least 74 articles in Italian and another 50 in French. That’s how much news coverage Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi has received for his decision to have a statue of Mars […]

“Red goddesses” in greater Cahokia

July 26, 2010

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The most unusual archaeological job I ever had was back in graduate school, and it remains the only archaeology job I did wearing three-inch heels. As a student at the University of Illinois, I was drafted along with a friend to stand near the pedestal on which the newly discovered Birger figurine was displayed at […]

Orkney Venus or Westray Wifie: The power of sexual archetypes

June 16, 2010

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The daily Scotsman reported on June 15 that “The Orkney Venus has been named in a shortlist of three for the Best Archaeological Discovery category in the 2010 biannual British Archaeological Awards”. The find is truly important: the object under consideration is almost unprecedented in Neolithic archaeology of Great Britain, and is visually striking, as […]

Cleopatra and other queens: Is this part of an archaeology of sex and gender?

June 5, 2010

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“Her name is synonymous with power and glamour”: so starts an article in the Philadelphia Inquirer prompted by the opening of a new exhibit that opened this week at The Franklin Institute. Which raises the question: what is the relation between an archaeology of sex and gender and the long-standing fascination of the public, shared […]

Participation: Putting theory into practice

May 10, 2010

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The fourth and final section of my course, “Archaeology of Sex and Gender”, which provided the opportunity to develop the book Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives, asks students to put the theoretical approaches to understanding sex/gender in the past into practice. Student groups will have already been formed following week 10, when each student is asked […]

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