Browsing All Posts filed under »teaching«

Transforming archaeology through learning about sex and gender: final reflection papers

May 18, 2010

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The final reflection paper, unlike a research paper or project, asked students to integrate what they saw as key themes of the course, relating them to a book they had read independently. While these papers are too long to post in their entirety, it may be helpful to consider what made for an excellent final […]

Sex Work on the Barbary Coast: Anatomy of a Final Group Project

May 17, 2010

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How do students develop an outstanding final group project? My example here is from spring 2008, research culminating in a video made by the students in the section as they walked through San Francisco’s Barbary Coast, locating buildings that served as brothels and streets that were once centers of sex work. San Francisco’s Historical Society […]

Final reflection paper

May 16, 2010

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The assignments in “Archaeology of sex and gender” build gradually to give students experience in reviewing the scholarly literature already selected for the course; finding new scholarly literature on a topic of interest to them; working with others to develop and present additional course content; and finally, in what I call a reflection paper, synthesize […]

Sex and gender: what makes for a successful final project?

May 13, 2010

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Ideally, a student final project proposal would show a degree of understanding of concepts presented in the class, but would extend them in some way. For my project, I would like to learn more about the galli of ancient Rome, whom I read about in my article for Project Benchmark I. They are interesting because […]

Participation: Putting theory into practice

May 10, 2010

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The fourth and final section of my course, “Archaeology of Sex and Gender”, which provided the opportunity to develop the book Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives, asks students to put the theoretical approaches to understanding sex/gender in the past into practice. Student groups will have already been formed following week 10, when each student is asked […]

Approaching sex through archaeology: celibacy and sex

May 8, 2010

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By the last week of the third part of the course, students are finally ready to begin to address one of the major drawbacks of much of the archaeology of gender: the way it elides sexual practices and experiences. By juxtaposing archaeological, art historical, and documentary history approaches to sex work and celibacy, we leave […]

Approaching sex through archaeology: mothering

May 7, 2010

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If sex/gender is relational– reflexively created through ongoing connections with others, through which we place ourselves in relation to them– then not only is it important to consider sex/gender development over the life course; it is also imperative to consider the role of parenting in the experience of sex/gender over the life course. To explore […]

Approaching sex through archaeology: becoming male and female

May 6, 2010

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When you move away from the idea that sex/gender is an inherent essence, something predefined at (or even before) birth, towards a performative, iterative, idea of sex/gender as something that you do, an ongoing process of acting in a particular way, the conversation shifts from “being” to “becoming”. Because the act of becoming, performing, enacting, […]

Approaching sex through archaeology: third genders and beyond

May 5, 2010

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Returning to a theme from the previous week, third genders, I begin my discussion of method and theory and how they change what archaeologists think we can do with a reconsideration rooted in Sandra Hollimon’s work on Chumash society of California. In Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives, I describe what Hollimon sketches out in a series […]

Approaching sex through archaeology: methods and theories

May 4, 2010

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My Discovery course at Berkeley, “Archaeology of Sex and Gender”, is taught over a 15 week semester. The first two sections of the course, “Thinking about sex and gender: disciplinary approaches” and “Sex and gender in the past: regional traditions” can stand alone as a one-quarter course at colleges that use the quarter system. Together, […]

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