Browsing All Posts filed under »history«

“Witch Cottage”? No. Cat Burial? Maybe.

December 11, 2011

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She was a very old woman, about the age of four-score years, and had been a witch for fifty years. She dwelt in the Forest of Pendle, a vast place, fit for her profession: What she committed in her time, no man knows. She was a general agent for the Devil in all these parts: […]

Where the Girls Are, Roman Edition

November 12, 2011

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Once upon a time, the kinds of things we could know about ancient populations were highly generalized. Now, through the work of people like Kristina Killgrove, that is changing– and you can be part of making it happen. I couldn’t be more happy. A while ago (a loong while ago) I started writing a blog […]

Separated at Birth

October 19, 2011

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The story in ArtDaily caught my eye for a couple of reasons. First, there was the headline: Researchers at SMU-led Etruscan dig in Italy discover ancient depiction of childbirth – first of its kind ever found. Yet another  “first of its kind ever found”, I thought, sighing about the media (again). But then I took […]

Bone deep: sex and the skeleton

August 27, 2011

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I have been waiting to see how long it would take the mainstream press to make the obvious joke about news the New York Times recently reported,  that a protein called osteocalcin, which is produced by bone-forming cells called osteoblasts, binds to a specific receptor on cells of the testes. Male mice that were unable […]

Dead babies still are bad evidence for a Roman brothel

August 9, 2011

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Last year I asked the rhetorical question “Are dead babies good evidence for a Roman brothel?” My post rehearsed a number of reasons to be skeptical of the widely reported story about a Roman British site being described as a brothel. Centrally, I objected to the claim that Roman women had “little or no access […]

Body Histories: “Expressive muscles” and women’s fatigue

July 8, 2011

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“Any doctor who saw how even experienced female athletes collapsed and were lying on the ground after the race could not support this kind of athletic competition for women.” Norwegian historian Kerstin Bornholdt cites this statement, by a German doctor, H. Franzmeyer, reacting to what he saw as the unsuitable participation by women in the […]

Making a Mark: From Graffiti by Coptic Nuns to Blogging

April 23, 2011

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Every scholar knows that professional conferences are where new research is first reported. By the time most research makes it into print, it is old news to us. Stories in the media can sometimes cut the time lag, either because a project circulates a press release, or there is a press center for the organization […]

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