Browsing All Posts filed under »embodiment«

“The Materiality of Everyday Life”: Commentary

April 29, 2012

0

Back from the annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, this year held in Memphis. I had been invited to be one of two discussants for a session organized by Cynthia Robin, professor anthropology at Northwestern University, and Lisa Overholtzer, finishing her PhD dissertation there. For me, the pleasure of seeing these colleagues, and […]

Separated at Birth

October 19, 2011

6

The story in ArtDaily caught my eye for a couple of reasons. First, there was the headline: Researchers at SMU-led Etruscan dig in Italy discover ancient depiction of childbirth – first of its kind ever found. Yet another  “first of its kind ever found”, I thought, sighing about the media (again). But then I took […]

Bone deep: sex and the skeleton

August 27, 2011

0

I have been waiting to see how long it would take the mainstream press to make the obvious joke about news the New York Times recently reported,  that a protein called osteocalcin, which is produced by bone-forming cells called osteoblasts, binds to a specific receptor on cells of the testes. Male mice that were unable […]

Body Histories: “Expressive muscles” and women’s fatigue

July 8, 2011

4

“Any doctor who saw how even experienced female athletes collapsed and were lying on the ground after the race could not support this kind of athletic competition for women.” Norwegian historian Kerstin Bornholdt cites this statement, by a German doctor, H. Franzmeyer, reacting to what he saw as the unsuitable participation by women in the […]

“Exploring Sex and Gender in Bioarchaeology”: Some comments

April 2, 2011

3

Just back from the annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, where I had the pleasure of being a discussant on a session organized by Sabrina Agarwal and Julie Wesp. Since my comments run to 2200 words, no way to post them and no point either– who would read them? But here are some […]

More Penis Spines!! (or maybe that should be penis bumps)

March 12, 2011

0

OK. I will admit that when I wrote the previous post– and the other one about the Nature report over at What Makes Us Human on Psychology Today, where I was perhaps a little more restrained– I did not think it would become a continuing series. But thanks to a wonderful reader over at PT, […]

Penis spines! (oh, and something about brains too…)

March 10, 2011

1

Nature‘s editors and authors tried, they really tried, titling the report published yesterday “Human-specific loss of regulatory DNA and the evolution of human-specific traits”. But from the earliest news report I can find (yesterday on Science 2.0, titled “Why Your Penis Has no Spine”) through to the raft of articles today, reporters have had their […]

British, Roman, or African? On race, ethnicity, and nationality

January 26, 2011

4

The past was not full of homogeneous towns. People in the past were not uniform in their cultures, their sexualities, or their subjective experiences. If I have one goal in my teaching– one goal in my writing– it would be to get that point across, so that finding difference in past populations would be expected, […]

Dressing for the Pleistocene

January 7, 2011

1

I have been writing about the archaeology of the body for a long time. My route to this topic started with thinking about gender as a repeated way of acting (following Judith Butler). I became especially interested in Butler’s concept of citationality– the idea that each person strives to do gender as it has already […]

Classical junk

November 20, 2010

2

(with apologies to the popular revolt against the TSA…) 348 articles, and counting. And that’s just the English language press… Google News reports at least 74 articles in Italian and another 50 in French. That’s how much news coverage Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi has received for his decision to have a statue of Mars […]

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,059 other followers