Browsing All Posts filed under »art history«

Women as Leaders in Early Christianity: Fairy Tales?

November 21, 2013

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When I find myself approving of the Daily Mail, I have to pause and ask what in the world is going on. But that is precisely where I find myself: feeling like the Daily Mail, for once, is not sensationalizing a story with its headlines on the reopening of Rome’s Catacombs of Priscilla: Do these […]

Bonampak Sex Change: From Heir to Heiress

October 28, 2013

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An article in the Mexican newspaper La Cronica de Hoy reported last Thursday on a new book being presented in Mexico this week, The Spectacle of the Late Maya Court: Reflections on the Murals of Bonampak. Written by art historians Mary Ellen Miller and Claudia Brittenham, the book builds on a long-term project by Miller […]

Powerful Women Existed in Moche Society: Now Move On

August 9, 2013

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How long does it take for us to not be surprised that powerful women exist? I wonder about that question a lot: every time the tomb or portrait of a woman of the noble class in Classic Maya society is found, we hear about how surprising it is that there were powerful women. Usually, this […]

(Warrior) Queen for a Day

October 5, 2012

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Tomb of Maya Queen Found– “Lady Snake Lord” Ruled Centipede Kingdom says the headline from National Geographic. And not just any kind of queen– the story opens The suspected tomb and remains of a great Maya warrior queen have been discovered in Guatemala. [emphasis added] I am trying to be excited. I am trying not […]

History, Memory, and Everyday Practice in Colonial Guatemala

September 9, 2012

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An unprecedented report of colonial Maya paintings from a residence, uncovered under years of overlaying plaster in the highland Guatemalan town, Chajul, provides an extraordinary window into the ways colonized Maya used what the colonial order offered in order to build a world that was not quite what the colonial authorities might have expected. Images […]

Honoring Janus, looking backward and forward

January 2, 2012

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Happy New Year! Ever wonder why January 1 is observed as New Year’s Day in the Gregorian calendar? I went on a journey to find a rationale for this unusual choice; biased by years of studying ancient Mesoamerica, I found it odd that with the winter solstice so close, the year began at an apparently […]

Separated at Birth

October 19, 2011

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The story in ArtDaily caught my eye for a couple of reasons. First, there was the headline: Researchers at SMU-led Etruscan dig in Italy discover ancient depiction of childbirth – first of its kind ever found. Yet another  “first of its kind ever found”, I thought, sighing about the media (again). But then I took […]

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